Course Evaluations and Research for Project 2: Unsolved Question
A. First, look for an email from Kristin Hyle, hylekm@appstate.edu with the subject line First Year Seminar Course Evaluation and fill out that evaluation.

B. Next, take time to explore the variety of scholarly library resources available for your research. Respond to the following questions on paper and ask any questions.

Use the class library guide which is a link on the course webpages (Google Dr. Sarah... class highlights): UCO 1200 Breakthroughs and Controversies in Science and Math. The guide contains web links to the library resources you are asked to explore. As you search, adding quotations around phrases, or using Advanced Search features may help you find more applicable information. Example: "genetically modified"

Exploration:
  1. What is the question or topic you plan to explore for the research project? You may need to tweak it later, such as narrowing or broadening it.

  2. Go to the library guide. On the guide, click the Articles tab. Explore the resources CQ Researcher and Academic Search Complete Search CQ Researcher (Try Keyword... or Advanced Search).
    Reports are written by an experienced journalist and features comments from experts, lawmakers and citizens on all sides of every issue. Numerous charts, graphs and sidebar articles, plus a pro-con feature, chronology, lengthy bibliographies and a list of contacts, round out each report.

    Write down:
    a) Did you find something related?
    b) What search terms did you you try? (you may need to vary the search terms)
    c) If you can find a related entry, then go to the Pro/Con and write down the names of the people and what "side" they are on.





    Search Points of View Reference Center for your topic. Points of View Reference Center contains materials from multiple viewpoints, including more than 1,300 main essays, leading political magazines from both sides of the aisle, newspapers, radio & TV news transcripts, primary source documents and reference books.

    Write down:
    a) Did you find something related?
    b) What search terms did you you try? (you may need to vary the search terms)
    c) If you can find a related entry, then take some notes so that you can find it again later.




  3. On the library guide, go to the Books & eBooks tab. Search the Library Catalog using keywords. Note the call number of any item you want to locate.

  4. On the library guide, go to the Encyclopedias tab. Explore the following encyclopedias for your topic. Search Science in Context for your topic. This source provides access to reference content, magazines, journals, news sources, experiments, videos, audio files, and more.

    Search the Gale Virtual Reference Library for your topic. This source provides full text to more than 100 reference sources, primarily encyclopedias.
  5. On the library guide, go to the Images and More tab. Find an interesting scientific picture that relates to your topic.
    Write down the source (careful--if it is a database of images, like Google images, be sure to go the original source to use as your citation, rather than listing the database link)


Focused Search:
  1. Create two "sides" for your question (may be "yes"/ "no" or some other dichotomy)

  2. Write down a viewpoint for side 1. This can include historical evidence and philosophical or ethical perspectives as well as unproven theories. Find a source with that viewpoint and research the type of publication and the credentials of the authors (credibility)



  3. Write down a viewpoint for side 2. Find a source with that viewpoint and research the type of publication and the credentials of the authors (credibility)



  4. Research current scientific consensus. What aspects do scientists agree about and what aspects do they disagree about? Keep track of any helpful sources you find.



  5. Read through Research Project 2--do you have any questions?

  6. Research some more interesting scientific/mathematical pictures and keep track of the source(s) of the pictures.



  7. What are some related interdisciplinary fields?



  8. Consider your own thoughts on the problem. What is most compelling to you and why?

  9. Continue researching to find more points for #7, #8, and #9.